What is your daily practice?

Site-Wide Activity Forums Shrine Room Amida Shu Buddhist Practice What is your daily practice?

This topic contains 20 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  Acharya Sujatin (temple host) 3 months, 3 weeks ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #1366

    shrineToday I have committed to re-starting a simple daily practice.

    I will start by lighting an incense stick and offering it to the Buddha on my little shrine, reciting the Impermanence Verse: “Time has passed with the swiftness of light…” (page 4). I will then do five prostrations using the prostrations chant.

    As an optional extra I can then sit for a while and either be quiet or do some chanting. I’m keeping it short and simple to make sure that I have no excuses not to do it every morning.

    I’ll finish by chanting three times: By the grace that I receive through Amitabha’s vows may I be moved to deeds for the benefit of all. 

    I’d love to hear about your daily practice if you have one, and if not, will you join me by committing to starting one. You can read about starting Amida Shu practice at home here to help you decide what you’d like to do. Let’s support each other in remembering the Buddha. Namo Amida Bu.

  • #1368

    Jules
    Participant

    My daily practice is observing…which may not be in connecting with any spirit, but then maybe it is? I write a small piece of poetry every morning – I have for years since I started writing ‘small stones’ 😉

    for example here is this mornings (which I might add to…just observing ‘Stella’ our Nor’easter snow storm which has already dumped about 6″ of the predicted 18″ inches of snow here).

    Stella’s Spring Dig
    (Elfje…)
    1)
    Nor’easter
    Packing its
    Punches in inches
    Snow’s shut down the
    City

    ~Jules

  • #1369

    Jules
    Participant

    (Actually my time is 8:07 am March 14, 2017) I’ve been up since about 6:30 am and have been out twice so far with the shovel. I have a snowblower, but I’ve been waiting to use it as to not disturb the neighbors who might be sleeping in…) ~Jules

  • #1370

    I do my daily practice with my partner, Ian. We do 10 minutes in the morning and 5 at night. Ian does Zazen. We sit by our shrine with statues of Shakyamuni and Kuan-Yin. I light a candle and incense. I do bows and silently chant the Nembutsu. There are lots of things on the shrine which other people have given to us- a piece of a Buddhist temple in India, given by Greta at our civil partnership ceremony (she bought it from the monks, she didn’t saw it off with a nail file), cards, stones, little statues, different incense holders, a mandala my sister brought back from Nepal…

  • #1371

    Connecting deeply with the natural world and writing poetry sound pretty spiritual to me! Hoping that Stella isn’t too extreme, Jules! She sounds quite feisty.

    • #1389

      Jules
      Participant

      Rev Sujatin,

      Thank you. I am glad I remembered to fill my bird feeder. It is a delight to watch the Cardinals, Woodpeckers, Chickadees, Mourning Doves and Junco’s stop by.

      Stella is slowing down…in our area at least. Thankfully we have good neighbors, one with a larger snow blower than the one I have has helped several neighbors by clearing walkways and driveways. Later today or tomorrow I think I’ll bake something for them.

      My snowblower is not large and does not like the wintery icy mix. So I had to do quite a bit of shoveling by hand. Hope things are ‘Springing Up’ your way.

  • #1374

    Johnathan Robertson
    Participant

    Andrew, I think that it is great that you and your partner practice together. That is quite rare around here in Baltimore.

    My latest little ceremony has been the Dawn Prayers, homage to the three jewels, nembutsu, homage to Prajna Paramita, Kwan Shi Yin, and the Pure Land, and a dedication of merit. Sometimes, I also sit silently in traditional zazen, with my eyes to the floor, or I will look up to my Amida scroll for a little while.

     

     

  • #1386

    Steve Durham
    Participant

    I call it my “daily, non-traditional [from a Christian perspective] prayers” … every morning I can, I light a candle and place it before a Buddha figurine (occasionally one that includes Kuan Yin), bow and say the nembutsu in all 4 directions.  Then I pray in a fairly traditional way, using some prayer phrases I learned in Eastern Orthodox (Christian) prayer books: “Save and have mercy on …” everyone from each family member in my own and my wife’s extended families, the sick and the suffering (by name), public officials and servants (especially “first responders), the poor, hungry, homeless, lonely, etc. etc.  If there’s time, and if I even feel like it by this point, I pray for myself as well, but only after the other parts are covered. Occasionally this tails off into a period of physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual silence. I have just had to come to terms with the fact I am spiritually an amphibian, at home in 2 spiritual domains, Pure Land (Shinshu) and a broad Christianity (Quaker despite the origin of the prayer phrases).

  • #1387

    Paul R Bilger
    Participant

    What is a good basic way to start with the chant?  Is there a description of a good way to start?

  • #1388

    Hi Paul, welcome.

    This page, http://www.amidamandala.com/how-to-start-to-practice-at-home/, has links to audio recordings of chants you can practice at home. Or you could do a simple recitation practice where you say, “Namo Amida Bu” for each bead you move on a mala.

    Hope that helps a little, let me know if you have any specific questions, or we could Skype sometime if you’d rather speak face to face.

  • #1391

    Every morning I say the impermanence prayer in front of my shrine. Such a wonderful prayer that reminds me of how fragile our lives are. I then bow and say Namo Amida Bu. In the evening I light an incense stick as an offering to Amida. Some days I miss the evening practice. I must try harder without becoming too attached to rituals rather than Nembutsu.

     

  • #1392

    Thank you for that comment, Jonathan. I think I am lucky to practice with my partner. It would be very hard for me to do early morning and last thing at night practice otherwise, although I do do a short silent Nembutsu practice in bed, just before I go to sleep.

  • #1393

    David Hope
    Participant

    I try to do at least 5 prostrations every morning (early with the dawn chorus today!). Also 1 or more qi gong exercises.

  • #1394

    Anonymous

    My daily practice starts with silent meditation. Then a prayer to Odin all father.

    Iam here father,you have called me,

    And iam here.

    Where your wind talks to trees,

    And carries your ravens to the mountains,

    Where the last of the old ones live.

    Iam here father,I take possession of my Heritage, and step into the line of my ancestors,

    I grasp the spear of my will,and gird myself with the courage of seekers.

    I draw the runes of power around me.

    Then I light incense sticks on my garden shrine and chant the nembutsu.

  • #1397

    Anonymous

    My daily practice tends to be a mixture of my Norse beliefs and my Buddhist beliefs from my days at the Buddhist house,some might not understand how I mix the two,but it works for me my Wa (harmony) is very good and each day is a new blessing.my last heart operation was very bad and I nearly( or as one nurse said I did for a while) died because of a severed artery.this caused a blood clot that caused my stroke.but I survived.so each day is a new life and a reason to celebrate namo amida bu.

  • #1398

    Mat Osmond
    Participant

    I pray the Dawn Prayers and read the Summary of Faith and Practice on many days, though not all, with sung nembutsu, maybe a mala or two, interspersed. I recite the rosary prayers pretty much every day, speaking whatever’s foremost in the heart to Nyorai, as Mother of God. Doing so has been my main daily practice for two years now. Somehow, each of these activities  – nembutsu, rosary – have come to embrace and imply the other, over time: the same entrusting gesture, as it were. Namo Amida Bu, sometimes Namo Quan Shi Yin Bosat, moves among all else, silently on the breath, or spoken quietly. I’m not at all sure this is a coherent way to proceed. In fact, I’m fairly sure its not very coherent. A work in progress, just as we are, as ever. Silent meditation I’ve all but abandoned as a formal practice, some years ago now.

  • #1557

    Shoyo Fernandes
    Participant

    For now, I recite Amithba’s in front of his picture. I will be performing a short ritual in the coming weeks.

  • #1979

    joseph
    Participant

    I do a lot of reading but no actual daily practice yet. I do say Nembutsu often in my head amidst an active and loud psychiatric unit that I work on. I would like to establish a simple daily practice before my work day begins

  • #3160

    Brian
    Participant

    For right now I do some formal chanting of Namu Amida Bu in the evening after work on mala beads. During the day I informally mentally or silently repeat the Nembutsu to myself while commuting or at work. I am currently reading the NienFo Book and seeing how I can incorporate it into my formal practice. I am also trying to get up earlier in the mornings to pray before and chant some Nembutsu formally to start my day off.

  • #3299

    Vittorio
    Participant

    Hallo!

    I have a question to submit to the Sangha.

    I discovered a small text by Nagarjuna entitled JUNIRAI .

    It is a very poetic script that has shaken me intimately:

    is it possible to introduce it into my daily practice?

    Thank you .

    Vittorio.      Gassho

     

  • #3301

    Vittorio – I don’t see any reason not to! If Amida has called you and connected with your heart in this form then, along with Nembutsu chanting, this would make a beautiful, profound and meaningful practice for you. What a blessing!

    :: link

    Junirai “The Twelve Adorations”

    About Junirai

    Junirai was written by Nagarjuna (c. 2nd –3rd BCE) the first of the Seven Masters of Jodo Shinshu. It expresses eloquently the depth of Nagarjuna’s gratitude to Amida Buddha.

     

    (translation below)

    KEI SHU TEN NIN SHO KU GYO

    A MI DA SEN RYO ZOKU SON

    ZAI HI MI MYO AN RAKU KOKU

    MU RYO BUSHI SHU I NYO

     

    KON JIKI SHIN JO NYO SEN NO

    SHA MA TA GYO NYO ZO BU

    RYO MOKU JO NYAKU SHO REN GE

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

     

    MEN ZEN EN JO NYO MAN GATSU

    I KO YU NYO SEN NICHI GATSU

    SHO NYO TEN KU KU SHI RA

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

     

    KWAN NON CHO DAI KWAN CHU JU

    SHU JU MYO SO HO SHO GON

    NO BUKU GE DO MA KYO MAN

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

     

    MU BI MU KU KO SHO JO

    SHU TOKU KYO KETSU NYO KO KU

    SHO SA RI YAKU TOKU JI ZAI

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

     

    JIPPO MYO MON BO SASSHU

    MU RYO SHO MA JO SAN DAN

    ISHO SHU JO GAN RIKI JU

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

     

    KON TAI HO KEN CHI SHO KE

    ZEN GON SHO JO MYO DAI ZA

    O HI ZA JO NYO SEN NO

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

     

    JIPPO SHO RAI SHO BUSSHI

    KEN GEN JIN ZU SHI AN RAKU

    SEN GO SON GEN JO KU GYO

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

    SHO U MU JO MU GA TO

    YAKU NYO SUI GATSU DEN YO RO

    I SHU SEPPO MU MYO JI

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

     

    HI SON BUSSETSU MU AKU MYO

    YAKU MU NYO NIN AKU DO FLI

    SHU NIN SHI SHIN KYO HI SON

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

     

    HI SON MU RYO HO BEN KYO

    MU U SHO SHU AKU CHI SHIKI

    O JO FU TAI SHI BO DAI

    KO GA CHO RAI MI DA SON

     

    GA SETSU HI SON KU DOKU JI

    SHU ZEN MU HEN NYO KAI SUI

    SHO GYAKU ZEN GON SHO JO SHA

    E SE SHU JO SHO HI KOKU

     

    NAMANDABU

    NAMANDABU

    NAMANDABU

    NAMANDABU

    NAMANDABU

    NAMANDABU

     

     

    EKOKU

    GAN NI SHI KU DO KU

    BYO DO SE ISSAI

    DO HON BO DAI SHIN

    O JO U AN RA KOKU

     

    The English translation of this gatha is from the Shinshu Seiten, Jodo Shin Buddhist Teaching, published by the Buddhist Churches of America, 1978.

    Junirai Translation
    Before Amida Buddha, whom Deva and men worship,

    I humble myself in deepest reverence.

    In His wondrous Land of Bliss

    Surrounded is He by countless Bodhisattvas.

     

    His golden form shines forth pure, like the King of Mount (Sumeru);

    His practice of Truth is steadfast, like an elephant’s pace;

    His eyes radiate, like pure blue lotus blossoms.

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

     

    His countenance is perfectly pure and round, like the full moon;

    His majestic light shines like a thousand suns and moons;

    His voice is like a heavenly drum, yet like a heavenly bird (Kokila).

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

     

    Avalokitesvara wears upon his crown,

    The image of Amida adorned with many precious jewels,

    He subdues the arrogance of demons and heretics,

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

     

    Incomparable, vast and pure His Virtues are,

    Clearly extending like vast open space,

    His acts freely benefiting all.

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

     

    Bodhisattvas from the ten quarters

    And countless maras always venerate Him.

    He dwells with Vow-power for the sake of all beings.

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

    In the Golden treasure pond where the lotus flowers bloom,

    Established with goodness is a wondrous throne;

    Where reigns the Lord, like the King of Mount (Sumeru).

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

    From the ten quarters Bodhisattvas come,

    Revealing wondrous powers, they attain blissful state;

    Honoring His face, they offer eternal homage.

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

     

    All things are transient and without self

    Like the moon on water, lightning, shadow, or dew.

    “The Dharma cannot be expressed by words,” the Buddha proclaimed.

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

     

    No words of evil are in His Land;

    No fear of evil doers, nor evil paths;

    With sincere heart all beings worship Him.

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

     

    His Land of infinite expediencies

    Is without degenerate things or wicked beings;

    Upon Rebirth, Non-Retrogressive Bodhi does one attain.

    Thus I prostrate myself before Amida Buddha.

     

    Thus have I praised the Virtues of Amida.

    Boundless are they like the water of the sea.

    Upon receiving these pure and good qualities

    May all beings be reborn into his Land.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Skip to toolbar